"" "

The Art of the Psychological Thriller

Imagination is usually seen as something positive. But can there be too much of a good thing? That’s the question Australian filmmaker Melissa Brattoni explores in her prize-winning film “In My Mind.”  As she did in “Meshes of an Autumn Afternoon,” the filmmaker plays the starring role, which earned her a “Best Actress” nomination at the…

read more →

The Art of Homage: a Twist on Psycho’s Shower Scene

Regg Skwarko’s “Steam” immediately brings to mind Psycho’s shower scene. But—spoiler alert—there is a terrific twist. The film is one of the finalists in the 2017 Cinephone Film Fest. Anything else we might say about it would ruin your viewing experience, so instead, let’s talk about the art of homage. In the world of film…

read more →

The Art of the One-location Horror Film

One secret to producing a modestly budgeted movie is to stage all the action in a single location. Doing so not only saves resources but can add to a drama’s intensity.

read more →

The Art of No-budget Filmmaking

Elliott Maguire is a Manchester-based filmmaker who has just completed “The Ferryman,” a horror feature shot on an iPhone 7. In the following interview, he tells what led him into the often-scary world of no-budget filmmaking. MMM: How did you get into filmmaking? MAGUIRE: I’d love to give the typical “shooting movies as a child…

read more →

The Power of the Single-location Film

Filmmakers have long explored the dramatic possibilities of “confined” dramas, stories that unfold in one or just a few locations. Memorable examples include “Rear Window” (1954), “The Phone Booth” (2002), and “Paranormal Activity” (2009). Joining that illustrious group is “The Cloud,” a smartphone-shot sci-fi thriller set entirely in an elevator. At the 2016 year’s MoMo Film Festival in Zurich,…

read more →

Four horror film ingredients in “13th Floor”

In “13th Floor” Luis Mendes combines  four horror film ingredients to evoke a sense of dread. Mendes, a prize-winning mobile moviemaker, demonstrates that techniques found in feature-length horror movies work equally well in short form storytelling. Here are the ingredients that make “13th Floor” scary: 1. Ordinary location: A familiar place lowers the audience’s guard, making the horror more powerful.…

read more →